Archive for the 'Barriers to trade' Category

Female Entrepreneurs Face Common Challenges Worldwide

What do women entrepreneurs from Tajikistan and Milwaukee have in common?  They both face common female-owned business challenges worldwide.

Tahmina Karimova owns Ozara, a handicrafts (as shown above) company in Tajikistan.  She is one of four women from Tajikistan visiting Milwaukee, Wisconsin through the International Visitor Leadership Program, part of the U.S. State Department.  Kimberly Kane runs Kane Communications Group in Milwaukee.

The idea behind the program is to strengthen foreign relations by facilitating  conversations among local people and their visiting counterparts. Each year nearly 5,000 people come to the United States through the program, launched in 1940.

“One of the benefits for me is that every country, even one of the most advanced countries in the world, has its own problems,” said Karimova who spoke through an interpreter. “We were coming here with the idea that America is a paradise. However, we are finding out very quickly that there are many problems including female problems. It’s not all as perfect as we thought before.”

Read more … ‘We realized we all have common problems,’ says female entrepreneur from Tajikistan visiting Milwaukee.

__________________________________________
Note: Don’t miss our next WEGGinar™ 10/11/17 on “Navigating Global Business Travel in 2017,” and presented by Stephanie Lewin, Global Immigration Attorney at Berry Appleman & Leiden LLP (www.balglobal.com).  Register here: https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/6874264726093775875.
Event is free of charge but you must register in advance to attend.
__________________________________________

Advertisements

Investing in Women-Owned Businesses Will Enhance Africa’s Productivity

It is the objective of Synergy Systems Consults (UK) Limited, a company that specialises in promoting and identifying partnership and investment opportunities within Africa, to influence dynamic changes in terms of exporting international expertise that will enhance productivity in Africa. For example, the Association of Certified Protocol Practitioners in Nigeria (ACPPN) is a non-profit and non-governmental organization aimed at promoting and raising the standards of protocol practice in Nigeria and sharing best practices globally.

Another initiative is the empowerment of women, which has a great potential to boost economic growth and facilitate the goal of an inclusive sustainable development throughout Africa.  Social, cultural, legal and gender specific barriers tend to deprive women of engaging in specific industry supply chains.  There is a need to promote the successes and transformative framework for women that will eliminate barriers and build stronger economies.

Investing in women-owned business and assimilating them into corporate supply chains can also contribute significantly to the world’s economy. Today’s economy records less than one per cent of spending by large businesses on suppliers as produced by women-owned business, generating new employment opportunities and so on.

To strengthen competitiveness, a country must focus on women’s empowerment to achieve an innovative and growth-oriented environment.

Read more …

__________________________________________

Note: Don’t miss our next WEGGinar™ 7/12/17 on “How to Finance Your Exports,” and presented by Xiomara Creque-Bromberg, Export Finance Manager, Minority and Women Owned Business & Multiplier Outreach Division, Office of Small Business, Export-Import Bank of the United States.  Register here: https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/4467897765873413377.
Event is no charge but you must register in advance to attend.
__________________________________________

Two Chicago Businesswomen Nail It on Taking Their Business Global

TwoChicagoWomenNailItOnTakingTheirBusinessGlobal

International expansion offers growth and the opportunity to not only scale a business, but to diversify as well.  And you don’t need a big investment to pull it off.  Here are two cases to prove it.

Chris-Tia Donaldson, founder of Chicago-based Thank God It’s Natural, a line of hair care products for textured hair, grew her global audience through social media—the international orders and distribution requests flowed in from there.  The question for Chris was never should I do this [go global]; it was more, where should I go first?

Jamie (pictured) and Stephanie Kaplan, the sisters who founded Chicago’s Pinch Provisions, which makes “emergency” kits packed with miniature beauty products, bandages and other essentials, saw the opportunity to grow their business internationally fairly quickly but the key to exporting the kits was based on which regulations they thought they could meet as quickly as possible.  They launched in Canada, France and then the U.K., with Australia focused on next.

Chris and the Kaplan sisters offer the following four tips when taking a business global:

  1. Decide where to expand.
  2. Navigate compliance.
  3. Build a retail strategy.
  4. Cross barriers (whether it be language, cultural or currency fluctuations).

Read more:  How two scrappy Chicago beauty companies are nailing international expansion

__________________________________________

Note: Don’t miss our next WEGG webinar 6/8 on “Avoiding Scams, Fraud & Deceit in Your International Business: How to Conduct Effective Due Diligence,” and presented by expert Louise Kern. Register here: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/3785897085114894084. Event is no charge but you must register in advance to attend.

__________________________________________

Attracting and Promoting Women Entrepreneurs in Cross-Border Trade

Screen Shot 2015-07-18 at 4.58.50 PM

Women play a big role in regional, national and international trade, competitiveness and economic growth.  Governments, private sectors and nonprofits such as WEGG can contribute and support women in economic leadership and global trade..

For example, women entrepreneurs in Uganda have asked their government to address the issues of non-tariff barriers (NTB), saying they hinder women’s participation in cross border trade.  NTBs are a form of restrictive trade where barriers to trade are established and take a form other than a tariff.  Non-tariff barriers might include quotas, levies, embargoes, sanctions and other restrictions.

Uganda Women Entrepreneurs Association Ltd. (UWEAL) indicates there is need for concerted efforts to address the challenge of NTBs, to come up with solutions and to attract and promote more women in cross border trade.

Read more:  Non-Tariff Barriers Failing Cross-Border Trade

Screenshot courtesy:  UWEAL

 


WEGG Mission

Our mission is to educate women business owners and entrepreneurs worldwide on how to go global so they can run healthier businesses and create a new future for themselves, their families and their community.

Women Entrepreneurs GROW Global is a 501(c)3 nonprofit organization. EIN/Tax ID #47-2956522.
View All WEGG Webinars
WEGG Newsletter Sign Up
Join us for the WEGG Grow Global Workshop in 2017!

Join 1,833 other followers

Categories

Archives

Ask a Question

Honors & Awards

Use Smile Amazon and WEGG receives a .05% donation from Amazon on eligible purchases.

Donate Your Gift Card to WEGG!

Not know what to do with your Starbucks or Target Gift Card?  Put it to good use.  Exchange it for a donation to WEGG!  You will receive a tax receipt for the entire full value or any unused balance of your card.

Copyright Notice

©2008-2017 Women Entrepreneurs GROW Global.
All rights reserved.

%d bloggers like this: