Archive for the 'Outsourcing' Category

From a Man Who Runs An Online Dating Service

Joshua Pompey (his site is here) shares three things he learned from running his own company.  Here’s one.

1. Be extremely weary of hiring overseas help.

If there is one mistake I wish more than anything I could take back, it would be hiring help overseas to perform SEO tasks.

The idea of cheap help is appealing to anyone.  Workers overseas will charge us fractions of what we would pay for U.S. based help.

The problem is, how much can we really trust a complete stranger from another country?

I learned this the hard way.

In one situation, I not only received a penalty from Google due to a man I hired to work for me, but when I confronted him about it he threatened to destroy my website if I didn’t send him one hundred dollars!  Talk about being stuck between a rock and a hard place.   I either had to allow myself to be extorted or would have to risk my entire site being messed with!

My point is, hiring someone overseas can be effective for certain tasks in which not much trust is involved.  But be careful whom you hire.  The consequences may not be worth the money you are saving.

Agree or disagree?  I welcome your feedback.

Note:  Pompey defines his site as World’s Greatest Male Online Dating Advice – Attract Women Guaranteed

Posted by:  Laurel Delaney

Grow Sales By Importing

Have a great new product idea but don’t know how to find a manufacturer to produce it?  Look no further.

To find suppliers of the product you want to import, you’ll need to consult some specialized online resources. These four are a good start: Alibaba, Global Sources, ThomasNet and Kompass. If you contact the U.S. Embassy in the country you are interested in importing from, they might be able to help as well. When you travel internationally, provided you set aside time to do a little shopping, you might stumble upon a product you like and find out who the manufacturer is (look on the package). I have managed to do this several times in the course of my international career. It works.

Read the entire article:

Importing:  How to Find a Supplier For the Product You Want to Import

Posted by:  Laurel Delaney

Explore Overseas Production Partners

Four businesswomen from Bee Inspired, LLC — a company that spreads inspirational messages, motivational thoughts, and positive actions throughout the world — share experience about taking their company global. They successfully launched their first product and globally sourced the main components in less than one year.  Conducting international business can indeed be challenging but as they women point out, that if you lead with passion, resourcefulness and determination, absolutely no challenge is insurmountable.

One of the questions addressed:  How did your company get involved in international business?

Sue Dickinson: After talking with several local manufacturers, we soon realized domestic production costs would keep us from pricing the product competitively. So in order to get to a lower price point we went to Alibaba.com and explored foreign production partners. We connected with a manufacturer in India and worked through all the details, specifications and quality over e-mail and the Internet.  Actually, we never even spoke to our contact on the phone until after we imported our first 500 units. In a relatively short time frame, they delivered the products we specified, at the quality level we required, and at the right cost.

Learn more and PURCHASE here.

FYI:

In less than a year this group of ladies took an idea, made global connections and launched their first product—and a promising international company. They make it look simple by leveraging local and global resources along with technology. Visit www.portlansing.com to learn more about Bee Inspired and how Greater Lansing is going global.

Posted by:  Laurel Delaney

Globalization Trend

globaltrendsconnectedness

One of our very own WEGG contributors, Steve King, is quoted in this U.S. News and World Report article, “Best Small Businesses To Start,” The article is authored by one of our favorite entrepreneurial reporters:  Matthew Bandyk.  Here’s the part on globalization:

Another trend is globalization. More U.S. businesses than ever are connected with the world. There’s a huge market out there for American entrepreneurs to sell to, and it’s growing. “There’s going to be an equivalent to the U.S. middle class created each year over the next decade” in the developing world, says Steve King of the Institute for the Future.

Some entrepreneurs—be they companies going global or outsourcing firms educate and train businesses in the new game of globalization. Export managers link domestic buyers with foreign sellers.

So if you are reading this blog, you are on the right track for 2009!  Start growing global and get connected to everyone, everywhere.

Posted by:  Laurel Delaney


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