Archive for the 'Marketing' Category

When You Are Good at What You Do, You Will Get Recognized Globally

Female drummers in bands in Singapore are taking the world by storm. Even though the profession is considered a thankless job, their role as the rhythmic backbone of a unit can be overshadowed by the presence of guitar wizardry or the antics of vocalists.  It’s also no secret that the profession is largely male-dominated yet in the article below, the author speaks to some of the talented women about their experience as active drummers in Singapore.

One drummer said this:

When you are really good at what you do, you will get recognized [globally], no matter your gender.

I would like to think everyone can overcome and achieve great things with their skills and attitude. Being girls doesn’t necessary put us in disadvantage. In fact, sometimes, it’s probably easier to attract attention when you’re a girl.

Read more  …

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Note: Don’t miss our next WEGGinar™ 5/10/17 on “How to Improve Your Website For Global Customers,” and presented by John Yunker, Co-founder of Byte Level Research, author of “Think Outside the Country.” Register here:  https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/4596645079593705731.
Event is no charge but you must register in advance to attend.

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Video-Blogging: Talk to the World Through Your Business

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Jaeny Baik (www.jaenybaik.com)

Today we are featuring a practical article from former TV host Jaeny Baik on 10 tips for creating compelling video blogging for your business.  Video-blogging is a great global marketing tool for websites because people the world over have a voracious appetite for videos. Here’s a glimpse of Jaeny’s first tip:

1. Keep it simple. You don’t need fancy equipment — your smartphone will do. For brief video blogs, you can record on your smartphone — get an adapter to put it on a tripod so you can have both hands free. While you can record sound without an external mic if you’re within arm’s length, you could add a microphone that works with your smartphone. And you can use iMovie or YouTube’s editing or other basic editing software on your smartphone to make quick edits and post to your YouTube channel.

If you do not have video-blogging in place for your business, you better get on it:

But entrepreneurs and small businesses lacking the resources to commission professional videos risk being left behind in a trend that, according to Cisco, is projected to see video comprise more than two-thirds of all global mobile data traffic by 2018. – Source:  “Entrepreneurs learn to create videos a must-have for website marketing

Read more:  10 Tips for Video Blogging for Your Business

Photo courtesy:  Jaeny Baik (be sure to visit her website)

Posted by:  Laurel Delaney

 

Factors to Consider When Growing Your Business Global

Becca Berkenstadt, marketing intern at DePaul University, Coleman Entrepreneurship Center, shares her knowledge about international business dealings.  She addresses cultural, political, economic, societal and demographic questions you should ask before you go global.

Factors to Consider When Expanding Your Company Internationally

Find Becca on Twitter.

Related article, “20 Factors to Consider Before Going Global.

Posted by:  Laurel Delaney

How The Mighty Woman Entrepreneur Succeeds Globally

Faster than a speeding bullet. Energetic, enthusiastic, adaptable, flexible, accessible, decisive, nimble, innovative, responsive — in other words, you are pretty mighty already, right?

But all things considered, are you strong enough to continue driving your business results to the next level (globally)?

Here are six super tips that I wrote under the sponsorship of Verio to update your business and help you become leaner, stronger and poised for greater growth in coming years.

How the Mighty Succeed Globally

Posted by:  Laurel Delaney

How to Avoid Dumb Mistakes in China

What a powerful, practical learning lesson:  “Three Dumb Things Foreign Companies Do In China.”

1.  Failing to localize your advertising.

2.  Trying to be trendy.

3.  Not making things big.

Chinese like things big. They are proud to have the world’s largest airport, the biggest building under one roof, the tallest hotel (pictured) and even the world’s longest laundry chute (at the Park Hyatt in Shanghai). Chinese tend to equate bigger with better. They don’t feel respected and won’t buy if a brand has a tiny store that doesn’t stock the newest season’s products. They know from the Internet and from traveling abroad what exists in other markets, and they want brands to have as big a presence in China as elsewhere.

Hint on what works:

Companies that convey the message that their brands can be trusted — and also that they can meet the needs of local consumers.

Read all about it here.

Posted by:  Laurel Delaney

How Can You Get Customers Overseas?

wegg1Global business is now a part of our daily conversations. Yet when I think about the entrepreneurs I know (in the U.S.), I’m astonished at how few of them actually do any business across borders. And the few I do know tend to focus on outsourcing or overseas production – the expense side, if you will.

I can probably count on one hand the number that go global in search of revenues.

While I have a couple theories on why that may be (I’ll save that for another day), it got me thinking…how can an entrepreneur or business owner prospect for global customers? What are some low-budget methods to source new business? How can one lower the barriers of language and cultural differences to reach people in foreign countries? How can technology be used to save on hard costs like travel, and soft costs like learning curve, in order to get to know the marketplace?

In thinking about those questions, I came up with some ideas. I’d love to hear your feedback on these, and other ideas that you have, either through experience or through simple brainstorming.

  1. Use existing customers as “listening posts” and advocates. If you already have any customers abroad, contact them and try holding personal conversations via Skype or email. Ask them how to get more customers in their region/country, and if they will help you with the process (perhaps even give them an incentive). Find out what distribution channels are used in their region
  2. Find your competitors’ customers. Google your product/service in specific countries to see who the main competitors are. On their web sites, look for customer testimonials, case studies, etc. to identify prospective buyers of your product/service.
  3. Search for a local trade association. These organizations are in existence to promote and serve their particular industries, and will often go out of their way to help companies grow. They may have marketing opportunities, access to buyer lists/groups, and networking contacts.
  4. Use eBay, Facebook, and other social networking sites used in that region. The former is better to sell product, and the others are better for services. Not only can you use conventional listings or ads, but on Facebook you can also set up your own group/company account.
  5. Post videos on YouTube to explain your company’s products/services or for “how-to” processes. Videos can help build trust among people who don’t know you, demonstrate your expertise, and put a friendly face on your company.
  6. If you’re a B2B firm, ask current customers for referrals to overseas business units. Explain to your domestic customers that you are interested in pursuing global customers and if they have contacts in the company’s offices around the globe.
  7. If your product is purchased as a gift, offer overseas shipping. Sounds like a no-brainer, but I’m still surprised at how many e-commerce sites will state that they only deliver to nearby countries. Yes, there are customs issues and higher shipping costs to deal with, but when it comes to gifts (when people often buy on emotion, not to fill a need), customers may not mind paying extra.

I would love to hear about other sales and marketing tactics to cultivate business overseas. What experiences have you had that either worked or didn’t? What ideas do you have that other entrepreneurs might want to consider?

Either comment here or email me at rchadha [at] depaul [dot] edu.

Posted by Raman Chadha – Coleman Entrepreneurship Center, DePaul University

Launching a Business in a Tailspin Economy

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With the economy in a slump, new business can be risky business.  Yet in spite of the uncertainty, many women feel cautiously optimistic about their business opportunities.  About 58 percent of women business owners polled in the  October 2008 Business Risk Survey expect revenues to grow in 2009.

What can be done to minimize risk in a down economy?

Karin Abarbanel, co-author of Birthing the Elephant, a new guide for women launching a business, stated in a recent interview:

“Businesses fail in a thriving economy, and businesses succeed in a down economy…The real key to beating the odds, which are daunting whether the economy is up or down, is a lean launch strategy that allows you to proceed economically and substitute brains for bucks.” 

If you want to launch a business in a tailspin economy, make sure you define your niche clearly and keep these things in mind:

1. In a down economy, customers become more discriminating and only buy products which meet their needs spot-on.  Businesses that provide exactly what customers want when they want it will hold market share throughout a downturn.

2. A lean launch is key.   To meet customer needs with minimal capital investment, small businesses are increasingly moving to a variable cost business model which means less up-front capital to get started.  Outsourcing, cooperative worksites, contract manufacturers, cloud computing, and infrastructure servicing companies like FEDEX allow small businesses to design, produce and deliver products on a variable cost basis, with little or no fixed cost investment. This lowers the bar for market entry and reduces the financial risk of starting a new business.

3. The Internet enables customers and niche providers of goods and services to find each other.  Use the web and think findability:  how can your customers find you and your niche products?  Expand your online presence beyond your company website and make it easy for customers to buy what you sell.

Posted by:  Carolyn Ockels

Think Mobile for Global Markets

Want to do business globally? Think mobile.

Around the world, mobile phones are becoming the primary tool for communication, and that includes wireless messaging, commerce, banking and advertising.

By the end of October 2008, India alone had 326 million users of mobile phones, almost 10 times the installation base of its landlines. Even more importantly, mobile phone penetration continues to grow by over 10 million units per month, while landlines are on the decline.

In South Africa, the Financial Times reports that nine out of 10 South Africans own a mobile phone, even though only half the country has bank accounts. Companies like Wizzit see the opportunity to grow banking and commerce through the mobile and are actively building the mobile banking sector. Key quote:

The power that is embedded in a cell phone makes it an obvious choice as a channel to get to the market.

Increasingly, customer contacts, financial transactions, and operations monitoring tools depend on mobile links spanning the globe. Anticipate customer access via the mobile, and design your business accordingly. You will reach a broader market more effectively.

Posted by:  Carolyn Ockels


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